Should Students Make the Fundraising Decision?

Some sponsors prefer to let their students make the fundraising decision. They feel since the students will be doing the work, they should have a say in what they’ll be selling.

Giving them this responsibility can also inspire them to take ownership in the sale. They’ll learn about making the right choice based on what they think people will want to buy. To be successful, it’s especially important that high school groups buy into what they’re selling, regardless of who decides on the brochure.

Letting your students decide seems logical, but does it always work? Here are some things you should consider before letting your students decide on the fundraiser.

1. Type of Fundraising Group

Some groups are more student-driven. For example, a student council group exposes students to leadership experiences and decision making responsibilities. These students can research the various types of fundraising opportunities and decide for the group as a whole.

It’s more difficult for groups who don’t have students in leadership positions to make an informed decision. In this case, the sponsor usually makes the fundraising decision.

An exception might be booster clubs that usually have parents making the decisions.

2. Sponsor Leadership Styles

Some sponsors are effective leaders because they’re good at delegating. Their students understand that the sponsor is ultimately in charge but they’re expected to make some of the group’s decisions. These sponsors can be motivational, inspiring and often lead by example.

Other sponsors prefer to be in charge of every group decision. They feel they have a better feel for what campaigns their community will support. These sponsors can also be good at establishing and enforcing student sales goals. They tend to provide strong direction and accountability.

Regardless of the approach to making the fundraising decision, sponsors should still have the final say on what their group ends up selling.

See our brochure fundraisers

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